Identify herbicide-resistant soybeans

Randy Raque, an Ohio plant pathologist, has a procedure that identifies Roundup-resistant fields to help put an end to spraying nonresistant crops.

By blending about 1 to 3% of yellow soybean seed with Roundup-resistant seed, crops are "marked" Roundup Ready, as you plant.

As the yellow plants emerge, they act as identifiers when a field is ready to be sprayed; when Roundup is applied, the plants are eliminated and subsequently do not produce seed. (If yellow plants do survive, they will produce beans.

Raque is now in his third year of field testing and says retailers and seed companies are showing interest.

Bulk seed handling

Offered in limited testing quantities last year, Pioneer's ProBox bulk seed-handling system is now ready for your farm. The plastic container holds 2,500 lbs. of seed (50 seed bags) and can easily be transported to the field by using a forklift. A flow-control slide and center-drain hopper bottom allows just one person to remove seed. Seamless walls offer complete seed cleanout in 30 sec. Contact Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., Dept. FIN, Box 1150, Johnston, IA 50131, 515/334-6908.

Soybean inoculant

After testing several new soybean inoculants, Ohio State University reports that with the added cost of $1 to $2/acre in inoculation, average yields show an increase of 3 bu./acre, or, according to Dr. Jim Beurlein, extension agronomist with the university, a profit for you of about $13/acre.

According to Beurlein, the product with the highest, most consistent results (with an average yield increase of 7.1 bu./acre) was HiStick soybean inoculant, from the MicroBio company in Cambridge, England.

Beurlein's test fields were typically in a corn/soybean rotation, had good fertility and appropriate pH values. Both tilled and no-tilled fields showed good results. A 14-oz. pack of the inoculant treats 8 bu. of beans. Price: $17.30 or approximately $2 to $2.50/acre. Contact Helena Chemical Company, 6075 Poplar Ave., Suite 500, Memphis, TN 38119, 901/761-0050.

Cows preferred the taste

seven to one in a palatability test conducted at the University of Wisconsin. Dairy cows were offered a choice between hay from WL alfalfa, a Pioneer variety and a Dairyland variety. According to researcher Dr. Dave Combs, not only did the cows choose the WL variety seven to one over the competitors, they also consumed 66% more of it than the competitive products.During the two-day feeding trial, 48 cows were fed uniform rations of two brands (WL 325 HQ alfalfa and a competitive brand) after their morning milking. From a total of 96 observations, 67% of the cows demonstrated a preference for the WL brand, 24% had no preference and 9% preferred one of the other two products. Average intake per cow was 2.87 lbs. for the WL brand and 1.73 lbs. for the competitive varieties. Contact W-L Research Inc., Dept. FIN, 8701 W. U.S. Hwy. 14, Evansville, WI 53536, 608/882-4100.

Monitor and control an unlimited number of irrigation pivots that are equipped with Lindsay's Zimmatic AIMS Advance control panels when you use the company's new AIMS Telemetry, PC-based, remote control system.

Each control panel is linked by telephone or telemetry radio to your PC that is equipped with the Windows-based AIMS Telemetry software. Trips to the field are reduced because all programming, operation and monitoring functions can be performed from your office or home computer, according to the company. There are no limitations on distance: Optional cellular or land phone hookup at the pivot removes radio transmission limitations. The event-driven software displays any pivot trouble, and alarm conditions can be relayed automatically to specified phone numbers at the pivots. Contact Lindsay Mfg. Co., Dept. FIN, Box 156, Lindsay, NE 68644, 800/829-5300.