At a transport width of just 12½ ft., the new Case IH 1200 Pivot-Transport planter won't be slowed down by narrow gates and bridges or setup. Once at the field, the operator stays in the cab, using in-cab controls to twist out the 12- or 16-row pivot transport toolbar and retract the tongue in less than a minute. Then it's off to the races.

Precise placement

The new planter also breaks speed limits for accurate seed placement in the field. And Case claims it can do it with any size or shape of seed. “The 1200 series planter plays no favorites,” says Case IH marketing manager Alan Forbes. “Our planter will consistently and accurately place any size seed corn, even mixed grades.”

The secret to this planting feat is the company's new Advanced Seed Meter, which uses a larger, 48-cell, 11¾-in. plastic disc that spins at relatively slow revolutions per minute even when the planter's ground speed is high. Slow revolutions per minute result in a more precise seed drop. No disc changes are required when going from a small, flat seed to a large, round one. “Even plateless seed can be planted accurately and consistently with the same disc and vacuum setting,” Forbes says. Different discs are available for planting corn, soybeans, cotton, peanuts, sugar beets, sorghum, sunflowers or edible beans.

The seed meter's vacuum sealing surface is incorporated into the cover design, so there are no rubber seals to replace. Driven by hydraulics, a 15-in. fan creates a consistent vacuum at each meter. This holds seed on the rotating disc until it reaches a vacuum cutoff point for accurate spacing and population control.

Less compaction

In addition to its new technology, the 1200 series takes many of its best features from the Case IH Cyclo planters, including early riser row units and a depth gauge wheel system to provide consistent depth control over variable terrain. Offset double disc openers are designed to reduce sidewall smearing and soil compaction. And because the weight of a 16-row unit filled with fertilizer and seed can reach 21,000 lbs., the 1200's four low-pressure (36 psi) Goodyear tires are designed to keep soil compaction to a minimum.

For operators experimenting with precision management techniques, 1200 series planters offer on-the-go variable rate capabilities. By 2003, Case IH customers will be able to upgrade their systems to include prescription application and central fill capabilities.

Prices range from $51,500 to $92,500. Contact Case Corporation, Dept. FIN, 700 State St., Racine, WI 53404, 262/636-5678, www.caseih.com or circle 200.