Farm Industry News Blog

Still too wet to plant in NW Ohio; changing up the oil maintenance procedures

While it's still too wet to plant in NW Ohio, blogger Daryl Bridenbaugh spends some time on his equipment's oil maintenance. His travels also take him to a house made partially of straw bale.

It has still been too wet to plant in NW Ohio. Some people who have a sandy field might try to get started later this week. We crossed the northern part of the state again last week on Route 224. There are quite a few tractors sitting in barn yards ready to go, but no planters were sitting out. On my large tractors I change all the filters each year. I used to change all the hydraulic and transmission oil also, but I was told that it was wasteful and that instead I should just pour the used oil back in the tractor and then stop when I see dirt or metal filings in the bottom of the 5 gallon buckets I use to drain the oil. I let the oil sit in the buckets for a day and the impurities settle out in the bottom 2 in. of the bucket. This is very economical; it probably saves about $1,000 of oil a year and makes for less oil to have to dispose of. I only drain my engine oil once a year. I use top quality para synthetic oil so I don't have to worry about how many hours the tractors run because the oil can run several hundred hours without breaking down.  

In my travels I stopped at Tiffin, Ohio and looked at a straw bale house that was built last year. I had read about it in a newspaper and wanted to see it. The walls are rated at R-80 and the home is almost energy independent because it also has its own windmill to generate electricity. I was extremely impressed with the tour that I took.  

Read more blogs from Daryl Bridenbaugh here.

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The Farm Industry News Blog features commentary from Willie Vogt, Jodie Wehrspann, Kathy Huting, Lynn Grooms, Daryl Bridenbaugh and Jeff Ryan.

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